x
Breaking News
More () »

What to know for Ohio's Aug. 2 primary

This election will only be for races in the Ohio Senate, Ohio House and state political central committee races along with local issues.

COLUMBUS, Ohio — In 2018 Ohio voters approved ending gerrymandering and required the lawmakers to redraw Congressional maps across the state.  

Three years later, Ohio now finds itself voting in a second primary as Republicans and Democrats on the state's redistricting commission failed to agree on how to fairly draw congressional districts.

The commission submitted five maps and the Ohio Supreme Court rejected all five.

A lawsuit was filed in federal court to break the tie, and the federal court allowed for a congressional map that the Ohio Supreme Court rejected.

Known as gerrymandering, the map that was approved created what was called safe Republican seats while creating Democrats seats that were viewed as with narrow partisan margins. The Ohio Supreme Court was looking for maps that reflected the 54% to 45% partisan breakdown seen in prior statewide races.  

So how can you have a fair election when the maps used in the Aug. 2 primary were deemed unfair by the Ohio Supreme Court?

"This is absolutely a fair election. Redistricting is always going to be in the eyes of the beholder," said Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose.

"I was disappointed with both my Democratic colleges and my Republican colleagues that weren't willing to roll up their sleeves and find that middle ground on district lines but the fact is we are where we are," LaRose said.

Meanwhile, the Secretary of State is urging voters to make sure they know where to vote for voting in person on Aug. 2.

In Franklin County, the number of polling locations has shrunk from more than 300 during the May election to 156 during this election.

You can find your polling location here

Unlike the May primary, this election will only be for races in the Ohio Senate, Ohio House and state political central committee races along with local issues.

The special election will cost Ohio taxpayers between $20 million and $25 million.

Political News: Recent Coverage ⬇️

Paid Advertisement

Before You Leave, Check This Out