Maria’s Message Informs Adults About Distracted Driving

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Davyd Miller gets behind the wheel of a driving simulator for the first time Thursday. He’s a realtor and distractions like what are on the screen aren’t anything new.

“Our car is our mobile office,” says Miller, whose ringing cell, texts and emails constantly require his attention in order for him to make his next sale. “What I'm supposed to do is to have a text that says I'm driving and I’ll get back to you later, but what a lot of people do is look at the text,” explains Miller.  

This is why the Greater Dublin Realty Association wants agents to get behind driving simulators.

Officer Chuck Collier is teaching real estate agents the dangers of distracted driving.

“They know that when they are out there working deals, trying to make phone calls and things like that, it could very easily be a distraction that could lead to a tragedy,” says Collier.

Within a minute of being behind the wheel of a simulator, Miller crashed while sending a text. “If we can break the habit as parents, our kids won’t see us texting and driving and we can break the habit,” explains Collier.

This is because in real life, you don’t always walk away from a crash.  

According to the Ohio Department of Transportation, 25 people have died this week alone in the state of Ohio.  

“We deal with the families after they have been notified as part of the investigation and it’s horrific,” says Collier.

Register for Maria's Message Presntation at Ohio Wesleyan University featuring Ohio's First Lady Karen Kasich here.

For Davyd, who is a realtor and a father, the message was clear from his short time on the simulator: distracted driving has consequences.

 

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