Some of the best education for dyslexia is in New Albany

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When it comes to classrooms, Marburn Academy doesn't offer your average.

Instead of just textbooks and dry erase boards, Marburn students learn language skills through play and activity.

"Often we'll do two small groups or one large group where one teacher is moving around kind of monitoring," said Jamie Williamson, Head of School.

Marburn is an independent school that focuses on students with learning differences like dyslexia and ADHD. The New Albany school is one of just 14 schools in the country whose language instruction program is accredited by the Academy of Orton-Gillingham Practitioners and Educators.

"[It] is a pretty rigorous standard for accreditation. So, they come in and they want to make sure that we are doing O-G work, as well as we possibly can do."

Students learn to break down words and the sounds of letters through strategic learning games.

"Kids with dyslexia have chronological processing disorder," Williamson said. "So, it impedes a kids ability to match up sight symbols and kind of break the code for reading. The more you engage your senses when you are trying to learn something, from a memory standpoint, the more you can hang on to the information."

Williamson says many parents bring their children to Marburn out of desperation and looking for a way to better their child's learning experience.

"It's really a beautiful experience to watch our kids walk in the door and blossom... and really see a kid all of a sudden go from feeling like they don't have a lot of worth in the community to they are SO important and they've got a lot of strength," said Williamson. "It's a magical transformation."

Marburn is open to 2nd - 12th graders.