Skywatch: Use the moon to help you find two large planets & then watch it turn full

Use the moon to help you find Saturn & Jupiter
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You can use the moon to help you find Jupiter and Saturn early in the week. You want to look in the south to southeastern sky at nightfall to do so. On Monday, the moon and Saturn will be very close. Above is how you’ll find the three on Monday night.

The Full Moon arrives on Tuesday night

Speaking of the moon, it’ll turn full on Tuesday evening at 5:38 p.m. This month’s Full Moon is known as the Full Buck Moon because this was traditionally the time of year that the animal’s antlers were beginning to peek out of their foreheads. It’s also known as the Full Thunder Moon.

Courtesy: Tom Ruen

Parts of the world will also be treated to a partial lunar eclipse on Tuesday night and Wednesday morning. Lunar eclipses happen when the Earth passes between the moon and the sun. The Earth’s shadow blocks out the light from the sun that typically illuminates our satellite. Sadly, we won’t be able to see the spectacle from here. In fact, none of North America will. The next lunar eclipse will happen on January 10, 2020; we won’t be able to see that one either. Click here for a link to see it.

Look for the moon in the daytime!!!

One thing you will be able to see in the coming mornings is the daytime moon! Look in the west after sunrise if you want to see it. You’ll be able to see it regardless of where you are on the planet, provided the skies are clear. Happy hunting!