Skywatch: Go planet watching and look for meteors

(Courtesy: NASA)
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Earth, Mercury and the Sun will all line up early this week at around 9 a.m. on Sunday morning. This is when Mercury will be in something known as inferior conjunction.

The three bodies will lie on the same line and it also precedes Mercury's return to the morning sky. You won’t be able to see Mercury as it’ll be washed out in the sun’s glare but look for it in the coming mornings.

Jupiter and Saturn meet up with Scorpius

Saturn and Jupiter can be easily found in the southern sky around midnight this week. The two will shine brightly as they hang in the sky in the evenings. They’ll be easy to find, just look for what appear to be two bright stars in the southern sky.

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Last Quarter Moon

The Last Quarter Moon will at 9:18 on Wednesday evening. The half moon will pop up above the horizon at around 1:45 a.m. Thursday morning.

Delta Aquariid Meteor Shower

If you think you’ve been seeing more “shooting stars” recently, there’s likely a reason. The Delta Aquariid meteor shower is active from mid-July to late August.

While it favors the Southern Hemisphere, we can still see them farther north and as the moon darkens, there’s that much better of a chance of catching one.

The shower is expected to peak early next week but it’s been ramping up. And if you’re out in the wee hours of the morning under a dark sky, you might just catch one. Don’t forget to make a wish. Happy hunting!