Opening statements delivered in Brian Golsby trial

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COLUMBUS, Ohio -- The latest developments in the trial of Brian Golsby - the man accused of killing Ohio State University student Reagan Tokes:

2:30 p.m. - Opening statements

Jurors heard opening statements from the prosecution and the defense in the trial of Brian Golsby.

Twelve jurors and four alternates were selected on Monday.

Golsby is accused of the rape, kidnapping and aggravated murder of Ohio State student Reagan Tokes in February of 2017.

He’s pleaded not guilty to the charges. If convicted, he could face the death penalty.

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2:10 p.m. - Jury Selected

A jury of 12 and 4 alternates selected in Brian Golsby trial – man accused of killing Ohio State student Reagan Tokes.

Opening statements to begin shortly.

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9:30 a.m. -- Jury selection underway for Brian Golsby trial

Jury selection is underway for Brian Golsby, the man accused of the kidnapping, rape and murder of Ohio State student Reagan Tokes.

Tokes disappeared in February of 2017 after leaving work at Bodega, a Short North restaurant and bar. Police say Golsby kidnapped her as she was walking back to her car along 3rd Avenue.

Authorities allege that Golsby then took Tokes in her 1999 Acura to two ATMs, raped her and then shot her twice in the head. Golsby has pleaded not guilty to the charges. If convicted, he could face the death penalty.

This morning, Golsby waived his right to a jury trial on "a couple of counts that are not typically heard by the jury," according to the bailiff for Judge Mark Serrott.

That does not affect jury selection. Jury selection got underway shortly after 9:30 a.m.

Prosecutors and defense attorneys are trying to select 12 jurors and 4 alternates to serve on this capital murder trial.

Last week, jurors were asked about their exposure to news coverage about the case and their feelings - both for or against - the death penalty.

Prosecutors and defense attorneys used this diagram last week to illustrate the two-phase process of this trial.

If jurors convict Golsby of aggravated murder, they would then have to determine if he was guilty of the aggravating circumstances. Jurors must weigh the alleged aggravated circumstances - the alleged rape, kidnapping or robbery - against the mitigating circumstances – that Golsby was allegedly raised without a father figure, in poverty, who was both sexually and physically abused, his defense attorney Kort Gatterdam told prospective jurors last week.

A death sentence must unanimous among the jurors and is only a recommendation.

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