x
Breaking News
More () »

WBNS-10TV Columbus, Ohio | Columbus News, Weather & Sports |

Violet Township Fire Department cuts dog bone out of Siberian Husky’s mouth

Maggie, a Siberian Husky, needed help after a bone she was snacking on became lodged in her mouth.

What is it they say about a picture is worth so many words? This picture is worth more than that. It’s worth a conversation.

“Maggie, we had never seen before as a patient,” Dr. Jennifer Schoenfeld said.

Dr. Schoenfeld at All Pets at Pickerington has cared for animals for more than 40 years. Last week, she received a call for help.

“The owner called and said my dog has a bone caught on her jaw,” Schoenfeld said.

Maggie, a Siberian Husky, needed help after a bone she was snacking on became lodged in her mouth. Dr. Schoenfeld says how this happens is the lower fangs or canine teeth in dogs, rotate backward.

Credit: Violet Township Fire Department Facebook

“So, once the bone gets behind there, it can’t pop over the other side,” she said. “That’s the problem with any bone that has marrow in it that’s circular.”

Schoenfeld says they could have taken care of it with their own equipment, but it would have taken almost an hour.

Instead, another phone call.

“And I called them and they’re like ‘Sure, we’d love to do that, we’ll be right over’,” she said.

“It’s not a normal call,” Lt. John Cordle said.

Lt. Cordle and Thurman Rohrbaugh with Violet Township Fire Department are no strangers to animal calls. This, though, was a first.

“To have one with a bone stuck on its lower jaw is just…I’ve been doing this for 24 years and that was a first for me,” Cordle said.

Pictures posted to the township fire department’s Facebook page document what happened. Maggie, under sedation, had to have the bone carefully cut with a rotary saw.

Credit: Violet Township Fire Department Facebook

“In general, we say no bones of any kind,” Dr. Schoenfeld said.

Adding to that, Schoenfeld says other things that can cause a ‘ruff’ go for pets are sheepskin toys, some dental chews that, if given too many, can be difficult for pets to digest and string-like objects like ribbon, thread or rubber bands.

Cordle and Rohrbaugh cut the bone out of Maggie’s mouth in less than five minutes.

The Humane Society of the United States offers helpful points for pet owners regarding treats and toys. You can find that information here.