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New body-camera footage released of Andre' Hill shooting, new directive to police officers rendering aid

Newly released body camera footage shows other officers on scene didn’t begin chest compressions on Hill until a superior officer urged them to.

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Newly released body-camera footages shows several Columbus police officers looking for shell casings as an unarmed Andre' Hill laid handcuffed and bleeding for several minutes before officers render aid and begin chest compressions.

Hill’s death marked another death of an unarmed Black man by law enforcement in America, prompted protests and led the city last week to fire Columbus Police Officer Adam Coy for his use of deadly force.

Coy’s use of deadly force was deemed to be unreasonable by Columbus Police Chief Thomas Quinlan and the city’s public safety director Ned Pettus, who agreed with Quinlan’s recommendation to fire Coy.

Coy was also admonished for failing to initially activate his body-worn camera or render aid to Hill.

Newly released body camera footage shows other officers on the scene didn’t begin chest compressions on Hill until a superior officer urged them to.

A 10 Investigates’ review of body-camera footage found that at least 12 minutes go by after Hill is shot before an officer begins to render aid to Hill.

The actions of the other officers on the scene are now part of an ongoing internal investigation being conducted by the Columbus Division of Police’s internal affairs bureau.

On Wednesday, Police Chief Thomas Quinlan issued a new interim directive – re-emphasizing the need for officers to render aid when encountering injured people.

 The new interim guidelines detailing officers shall, among other things:

  • Summon medical help as soon as possible
  • Administer aid
  • Ensure the roadway is not obstructed by cruisers so medics can respond
  • Clearly announce on body-worn camera who is taking the lead to render aid.

The new interim policy goes on to state that: “…We do not require every officer at scene to rush to a person’s side and every officer try chest compressions.  Some need to be assigned to guard the scene, separate witnesses, and serve other roles required of your position.  But preservation of human life is a primary duty and must be addressed as quickly as possible. Someone must be delegated that tasks and take on the duty to render aid. The policy that will be forthcoming will address unique circumstances such as Active Shooters, vehicle crashes, drownings, etc.”

Quinlan added: “It is my hope that these guidelines will provide further direction concerning the duties which are expected of us. We all took an oath to serve and protect, and I thank you for your ongoing efforts to honor that oath.  As we enter this new year, please continue to serve with excellence, be aware of your own health, and look out for your teammates.”

Two days after the shooting of Hill, on Dec. 24, Quinlan notified Columbus Division of Police officers that “Simply notifying radio to send a medic is insufficient. You are expected to take an overt act to provide emergency first aid to injured people until medics arrive.”

Some of the new body-camera video released Thursday also raises questions about the confusion and conflicting directions officers were given on scene about activating their body-worn cameras.

At one point, you hear an officer tells other officers “alright, everybody turn your cameras off.” Another officer asks: “Off?” A third officer says: “On?” And the initial officer says “off” while making a slashing motion with his finger across his neck.

The camera cuts off.

That moment happened after Hill had been shot and officers had arrived on the scene, but before medics had arrived.

A special prosecutor has been appointed to examine the shooting death of Hill. It’s not clear yet if Coy will appeal his firing.

An emailed message was again left for his labor attorney on Thursday. She has not responded to other previous requests for comment.

A copy of Quinlan’s new directive, issued Wednesday, is below:

 All Division Personnel:

Members of Executive Staff are aware of the current uncertainty surrounding the requirement to render aid to an injured person that you may encounter. The Division is currently working with the City Attorney’s Office and Fire Division to further refine our policies and training in order to assist you with providing aid to those in need.

In the interim, personnel shall follow these guidelines:

  • Summons medical help as soon as possible, notifying radio of the type of injuries when possible (gunshot, cutting, or other trauma) and providing a precise location of the wounded person.  Confirm with communications acknowledgment of the request for a medic to respond.  (The Radio SOP will be updated to ensure the request is verbally acknowledged.)
  • Administer aid:
  • After the scene has been secured of imminent or probable threats.
  • Attempt to stop visible bleeding at your level of training.
  • Check pulse and perform CPR according to your level of training.
  • Attempt to provide reassurance.
  • Special equipment (such as Naloxone, an AED, or a tourniquet) shall be used in a manner consistent with training.
  • Ensure the roadway is not obstructed by cruisers so medics can respond.  (Ingress/Egress)
  • Do not transport the victim except under the most critical circumstances.
  • Clearly announce on your BWC who is taking the lead to render aid.  We do not require every officer at scene to rush to a person’s side and every officer try chest compressions.  Some need to be assigned to guard the scene, separate witnesses, and serve other roles required of your position.  But preservation of human life is a primary duty and must be addressed as quickly as possible.  Someone must be delegated that tasks and take on the duty to render aid.  The policy that will be forthcoming will address unique circumstances such as Active Shooters, vehicle crashes, drownings, etc.

It is my hope that these guidelines will provide further direction concerning the duties which are expected of us.  We all took an oath to serve and protect, and I thank you for your ongoing efforts to honor that oath.  As we enter this new year, please continue to serve with excellence, be aware of your own health, and look out for your teammates.