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Mixed verdict for fraternity members charged in hazing death

The charges against Troy Henricksen and Jacob Krinn stemmed from the March 2021 death of Stone Foltz, 20, a sophomore at Bowling Green State University.

BOWLING GREEN, Ohio — Two fraternity members charged in the hazing death of a Bowling Green State University student were acquitted Friday of involuntary manslaughter and reckless homicide but convicted of several hazing-related counts.

The charges against Troy Henricksen, of Grove City, Ohio, and Jacob Krinn, of Delaware, Ohio, stemmed from the March 2021 death of Stone Foltz, 20, a sophomore also from Delaware.

Authorities have said Foltz died of alcohol poisoning after a fraternity initiation event in which he was hazed into finishing an entire bottle of alcohol. He was found unconscious by a roommate after members of the Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity dropped him off at his apartment.

Foltz died three days after he was put on life support.

Defense attorneys had argued that Foltz was not forced or required to finish the entire bottle and made that decision on his own. Wood County prosecutors argued that a “power imbalance” was used against Foltz by the fraternity members, which caused Foltz to believe the only way he would get into the frat was to drink the whole bottle.

Henricksen was found not guilty of involuntary manslaughter, reckless homicide and tampering with evidence, while Krinn was found not guilty of two counts of involuntary manslaughter, reckless homicide and felonious assault.

Henrickson was found guilty of eight counts of hazing and seven counts of failure to comply, while Krinn was convicted of obstruction of official business, hazing and failure to comply. Krinn is scheduled to be sentenced July 8 and Henricksen on July 29, but it wasn't clear Friday what punishment they might face.

Six other fraternity members pleaded guilty to various charges, and some testified against Henrickson and Krinn. All six could receive a jail term when they are sentenced later this year, but Wood County prosecutors have said they will likely receive probation.

Foltz’s parents said in a statement after the verdict that they will remain committed to combating hazing on all university campuses.

“It didn’t have to be this way, and make no mistake, it will happen again until Greek organizations and the universities that support them end hazing for good,” they said.

The family’s attorneys said the verdict sends a clear message that hazing is a crime and that “Greek organizations and universities that create environments where hazing thrives must also be held accountable.”

Foltz's parents, Shari and Cory, released a statement following the verdict:

“As we sat in the courtroom day after day listening to excruciating testimony about Stone’s final moments, we grieved. Not just for the senseless death of our beloved eldest son, but for the lives of the young men who are now being held accountable for their reckless and self-serving actions. It didn’t have to be this way, and make no mistake, it will happen again until Greek organizations and the universities that support them end hazing for good. We loved Stone deeply, and we lost him so young. We needed to hear the details and the truth about what happened to him that night, and we are grateful for the team that worked tirelessly to prosecute this case and the jury for their time and attention. While the trial is concluded, our commitment to Stone lives on. We will not rest until hazing is eradicated on all university campuses.”

The attorneys for the Foltz family also released a statement:

“The jury’s verdict sends a clear message; hazing is a crime, and those who partake in it will be held accountable. In addition, the Greek organizations and universities that create environments where hazing thrives must also be held accountable for their culpable inaction. Krinn, Henrickson, and the six other young men convicted in this case mirrored learned behaviors that should have been stopped years ago. Until people in power step up and end hazing or good, more wonderful families will be in the same position as the Foltz family—forced to sit in a courtroom replaying the excruciating last moments of their son’s completely unnecessary and senseless death.”

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