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Ezekiel Elliott's father facing 21 charges in connection to serval cat that got loose in Fairfield County

Stacy Elliott, father of former Ohio State Buckeyes and current Dallas Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott, is facing 21 charges in connection to a serval found loose in Canal Winchester in October.

Stacy Elliott, father of former Ohio State Buckeyes and current Dallas Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott, is facing 21 charges in connection to a serval found loose in Canal Winchester in October.

Stacy Elliott is also known as El Muhammad, according to the Department of Agriculture.

Back in October, the Ohio Department of Agriculture executed a search warrant at his home in connection with the serval that was killed by Fairfield County Sheriff's Office deputies on October 13.

The home is located in the 7400 block of Basil-Western Road NW, roughly a mile from the Jefferson Farms subdivision off Laurelwood Drive where a Fairfield County sheriff’s deputy shot and killed the cat.

Deputies told us the cat attacked a dog in the neighborhood and looked as if it was going to attack when deputies arrived.

Neighbors in the area told us they’ve seen “wolf dogs,” foxes and other exotic animals for years and believed they were coming from Elliott’s home. Neighbors said the serval cat was wearing a black collar when it was roaming the neighborhood before being killed.

ODA filed nine charges against Stacy Elliott:

  • Failure to notify of dangerous wild animal (DWA) escape
  • Falsification
  • Obstruction of official business
  • Allowing DWA to escape
  • Failure to notify law enforcement of DWA escape
  • Failure to have DWA signage at property entrance
  • Possession of a DWA
  • Failure to obtain DWA permit
  • Failure to have DWA signage on cage

Of those, eight charges are first-degree misdemeanors. The charge of obstruction of official business is a second-degree misdemeanor. Stacy Elliott is also facing 12 other charges, brought by the other agencies involved. A first-degree misdemeanor carries a maximum penalty of six months in jail and a $1000 fine.