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117 people, including children, infected with norovirus after camping event in southern Ohio

The outbreak happened over the weekend of May 13 when approximately 155 people attended Camporee at Camp Molly Lauman in Lucasville.

LUCASVILLE, Ohio — Health officials on Wednesday confirmed the outbreak that sickened more than 110 people at a southern Ohio camp nearly two weeks ago was norovirus.

According to the Scioto County Health Department, stool samples tested positive for norovirus.

The outbreak happened over the weekend of May 13 when approximately 155 people attended Camporee at Camp Molly Lauman in Lucasville.

The camp was a Girls Scout event that was run by volunteers at the facility, according to the Girls Scout of Ohio’s Heartland.

On May 17, the county health department said it received four or five complaints of people being sick.

As of Wednesday, 117 people were reportedly sick with norovirus. That number includes secondary infections.

Two children were hospitalized after getting sick.

While health officials have not said what exactly caused the attendants to become sick, they pointed out that those who became sick seem to have in common that they drank water and/or lemonade at the camp.

The Ohio Environmental Agency tested the drinking water and found that it met state and federal standards for adequately treated drinking water.

The Girls Scouts of Ohio’s Heartland told 10TV that all events at the camp are canceled through Memorial Day based on recommendations from the Scioto County Health Department.

An in-depth cleaning at the camp is scheduled to happen.

The norovirus is highly contagious and causes stomach inflammation, leading to diarrhea vomiting and stomach pain, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It spreads quickly in enclosed places like daycare centers, nursing homes, schools and cruise ships.

The virus can spread by having direct contact with an infected person, eating food or drinking liquids that are contaminated or sharing utensils or cups with people who are infected.

Those who get infected can feel severely hydrated, especially young kids and the elderly.

There are no drugs that can treat the virus. The health department says someone who is infected needs to drink plenty of liquids to prevent dehydration.

To learn more about the virus, visit the CDC's website here.

The norovirus is highly contagious and causes stomach inflammation, leading to diarrhea vomiting and stomach pain, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It spreads quickly in enclosed places like daycare centers, nursing homes, schools and cruise ships.

The virus can spread by having direct contact with an infected person, eating food or drinking liquids that are contaminated or sharing utensils or cups with people who are infected.

Those who get infected can feel severely hydrated, especially young kids and the elderly.

There are no drugs that can treat the virus. The health department says someone who is infected needs to drink plenty of liquids to prevent dehydration.

To learn more about the virus, visit the CDC's website here.

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