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FBI official: Escaped prisoners likely had inside help

The search for Richard Matt, 48, and David Sweat, 34, has expanded beyond New York, into surrounding states and even Canada.
nyinmatesescaped

CBSNEWSAs the search continues for two convicted killers who escaped from a maximum security prison in upstate New York, Ron Hosko, the assistant director of the FBI's criminal investigative division, said he believes the two suspects must have had help inside, reports CBS News correspondent Don Dahler.

"They have the time to try to corrupt a guard or multiple guards. They have time to look for the tools that might facilitate their escape. And quite clearly, these two have taken advantage of that," Hosko said.

The search for Richard Matt, 48, and David Sweat, 34, has expanded beyond New York, into surrounding states and even Canada.

The manhunt includes hundreds of officers in the air and on the ground.

"We are leaving no stone unturned. They could be literally anywhere. But they will be found and apprehended," New York State Police's Maj. Charles Guess said.

The pair were serving lengthy sentences for murder: Sweat for killing a Broome County sheriff's deputy in 2002, and Matt for murdering and dismembering his former boss in 1997.

Sometime before 5:30 am Saturday, investigators say the two escaped their adjoining cells through holes they cut using power tools.

They then broke through a brick wall, climbed onto a six-story high catwalk and made their way into a steam pipe, weaving through a complex series of tunnels.

They left behind a note with a racist drawing and the words "Have a nice day."

Authorities say the two emerged from a manhole three blocks away from the 150-year-old prison.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo toured the escape route and said it was like a plot from a movie.

"You look at the precision of the operation. It was truly extraordinary, and unusual, and almost impossible to duplicate," Cuomo said.

One of the big questions investigators are trying to answer is where they got the power tools, which have yet to be recovered.

Police are interviewing contractors who were working at the prison for leads and the state is offering a $100,000 reward for any information leading to the suspects' apprehension.