Neo-Nazi group posters cause stir In Circleville

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The presence of red, white and blue posters that began showing up a few days ago have caused a stir in Circleville.

"This is not us. This is not ok, We're not going to let this go on in our town, and we're going to stand up we're not going to let this go," says resident Cameron Jones.

Jones says he tore down two posters two days ago at the corner of Court Street and U.S. 23.

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The posters read: "Keep America American. Report any and all illegal aliens. They are criminals."

It's from a group called Patriot Front.

Richard, a member of the group who claims he's been with the organization for the past eight months says, "We object to the term 'hate group.' The goal is to create a white ethno-state. We think diversity is not good for anyone. We are very traditionalist pro-white, anti-Jewish organization. We are against minorities generally. We feel that everyone is better off in their own corner."

According to the Southern Poverty Law Center: Patriot Front (PF) is a white nationalist group that formed in the aftermath of the deadly “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, on August 12, 2017. The organization broke off from Vanguard America (VA), a neo-Nazi group that participated in the chaotic demonstration.

Bob Fitrakis studies groups like these and is co-writing a book about white supremacy in Ohio.

He says the group message is about concern over immigrants but is also really a cover to hide its Neo-Nazi beliefs.

"They 're not about border wall and helping Trump, they are about creating a white supremacist America," he says.

Fitrakis says these groups prey on people who feel left behind by American prosperity and says they pose a danger to communities who allow them to grow.

As for Jones, he says he plans to tear down more of these signs if he sees them.

"Hopefully, we can find out who is doing it. I think it's unacceptable. It's not ok," he says.

Under Brandenburg v. Ohio, the court held that the government cannot punish inflammatory speech unless that speech is "directed to inciting or producing imminent lawless action and is likely to incite or produce such action."