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This is what can happen when you release your goldfish into the wild

A city in Minnesota tweeted out some pretty shocking photos Friday morning, of massive, overgrown goldfish found in a lake.
Credit: City of Burnsville
Overgrown goldfish found in Burnsville, courtesy City of Burnsville

BURNSVILLE, Minn. — You'll want to think twice before dumping that county fair goldfish you won into a nearby stream or pond.

A city in Minnesota tweeted out some pretty shocking photos Friday morning, of massive, overgrown goldfish found in a lake.

"Please don't release your pet goldfish into ponds and lakes! They grow bigger than you think and contribute to poor water quality by mucking up the bottom sediments and uprooting plants," read the post.

It might seem harmless to release your unwanted pet goldfish into a nearby waterway, but you could end up doing serious harm to the local ecosystem.

According to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources' website, goldfish are listed as an invasive species. ODNR says goldfish are believed to be responsible for the decline in population for many native fish, plants and invertebrates in the state. Goldfish can also uproot plants and cause cloudiness in the water.

To report an aquatic invasive species, click here.