Critics say bar's controversial name promotes sexual assault

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A bar in the Milwaukee suburb of West Allis, Wisconsin, is stirring up controversy. Some locals think the bar's name and imagery do not belong in the year 2018.

The sign painted on the front door declares: "Walk Her Inn, Drag Her Out." Over the door is a cartoon caveman pulling a woman by her hair.

The bar has been around for over 30 years according to locals. The controversy around the name is not new, but has been brought back into the spotlight after an offended resident posted about the bar online.

Some think the name of the bar promotes sexual assault and "rape culture." It seems especially inappropriate in the #MeToo era, when millions of women are speaking out about the impact of harassment and assault.

"Having something that implies any nonconsensual activity right [when] walking in the door is very irresponsible," resident Christine Nell told CBS affiliate WDJT-TV.

"I can't believe this exists in our city, right next door. I can't believe it exists," said Paress Huebner, the resident who shared photos of the bar on Facebook. Huebner said she posted photos of the bar's signage to bring awareness and her post has gone viral.

The owners of the "Walk Her Inn, Drag Her Out" bar say they did not come up with the name themselves. They say they're open to possibly changing the name, but for now, they're sticking to it.

"I just don't feel someone's right to be offended is more important than my right to own a business," owner Diane Plumeri said.

Some locals agree with the owners.

"The name is not nudity, it's not profanity, it's just a cartoon," one resident said. "I don't think it needs to be changed. It's been "Walk Her Inn, Drag Her Out" for 30-something years," another bar regular said.

West Allis Mayor Dan Devine says the local government cannot regulate signage and is remaining neutral in this matter. Devine told WDJT that residents can send a message by deciding which establishments they chose to spend their money at.

The owners of the controversial bar invite any critics in to have a drink. "Come on in and check it out. If you find we promote raping and drug use and beating on women, that's not the promotion here nor has it ever been," Plumeri said.