Blue Jackets, Clippers providing customers information on how to avoid ticket tax

(WBNS)
Published:
Updated:

Starting in July, it could be a lot more expensive for Columbus families to be entertained.

Not only does the state's gas tax kick in, so does the City of Columbus ticket tax.

Starting July 1, all tickets sold above $10 will go up 5% at venues with more than 400 seats. Ohio State football games are exempt as are movie theaters.

Advertisement - Story continues below

For example, a $15 ticket will now be $15.75 and a $100 ticket will cost $105.

Prices to attend plays and sporting events will all go up 5%. The money will help support the greater Columbus arts council and help for future improvements at Nationwide Arena.

Ben Frech represents Advocates for Responsible Taxation. It's opposing the tax.

"This tax is going to be negative for a business that this tax is going to impact people's buying decision because it's another tax another fee it's another tax on there and the fees are going to the infrastructure or Huntington park but going to a non-profit arts group," he said.

Recently, the Columbus Clippers and sent a letter to its season ticket holders telling them how to avoid the tax for seven years with a signature commitment to purchase tickets in the future.

The Columbus Blue Jackets sent a letter informing fans they will be able to avoid the tax by paying for tickets by June 30.

"I'm not exactly happy about it, but the Clippers can do what they want to do," says Tom Katzenmeyer President and CEO of The Greater Columbus Arts Council.

It estimates the ticket tax will generate $6 million a year for the arts.

"We offer more than a million experiences every year in Columbus; that's what we don't want to do is cut back. This city is growing, there are 50,000 new people coming in every year we need to keep up with that we need to keep up with what our competitor cities are doing," Katzenmeyer said.