Pa. woman's breast milk record tenure brief

By

LANDISVILLE, Pa. (AP) — A Landisville woman's hold on the Guinness World Record for most breast milk donated was fleeting.

Cathie Rosado, who donated more than 336 gallons of breast milk to an Ohio milk bank, has been overtaken — as she predicted she would be — by a Texas woman.

According to the Guinness World Records website, Alyse Ogletree of Argyle, Texas, now holds the record for most breast milk donated.

Ogletree donated 53,081 fluid ounces of breast milk to Mothers' Milk Bank of North Texas, between Jan. 11, 2011, and March 25, 2014 — a tally made official by Guinness on Monday.

That's nearly 415 gallons of breast milk.

Rosado donated 43,053 ounces of breast milk to the OhioHealth Mothers' Milk Bank over a five-year period that stretched from April 28, 2009, to Jan. 10, 2014.

Rosado held the Guinness World Record from July 24 to Aug. 4.

She accepted her dethroning with grace.

"I'm fine with it," she said, joking that she and a previous record-holder "were trying to figure out what we pass — torch? Crown? — or maybe the Victoria's Secret Swarovski crystal bra."

More seriously, Rosado said she just was happy that she had an opportunity to spread the word about "the blessing of milk donation."

Rosado regularly freezes and ships containers of her breast milk to OhioHealth Mothers' Milk Bank.

The milk bank pasteurizes donor milk and ships it to neonatal intensive care units in 84 hospitals in 17 states and Canada.

Those hospitals include Heart of Lancaster Regional Medical Center and Penn State Hershey Children's Hospital.

Most of the donor milk goes to premature babies.

"Human milk is the only thing we know that reduces the risk of necrotizing enterocolitis," an intestinal infection that can be fatal to preemies, Chris Smith, nurse coordinator at OhioHealth Mothers' Milk Bank, said.

Rosado became what is known as an "overproducer" of breast milk after the birth of her second biological child five years ago.

Not wanting to dump her excess milk down the drain, she did some research and learned of OhioHealth Mothers' Milk Bank.

She could have sought medical intervention to help her decrease her milk production, but decided she'd rather put the milk to good use.

She donates not only to the Ohio milk bank, but to local babies whose mothers struggle to produce breast milk.

At her peak production, Rosado pumped breast milk every four hours, producing about 100 ounces a day.

She now expresses about 80 ounces a day. (An ordinary nursing mother produces half that, or less.)

She eats roughly 4,000 calories daily and chugs ice water all day long.

A controller for a York architectural products company, Rosado pumps at home and at work.

She can keep donating to the Ohio milk bank until December, when she will be at the 18-month postpartum mark (her youngest child is 14 months old).

She said last week that she "may continue on if my body cooperates and there is someone who needs the milk."

She has surpassed her own record-setting mark, but isn't sure if she'll seek the Guinness World Record again.

"It remains to be seen," she laughed.

___

Online:

http://bit.ly/1nrJOjb

___

Information from: Intelligencer Journal/Lancaster New Era , http://lancasteronline.com

©2014 by The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.