Bergdahl still being treated in Germany, says he was tortured by Taliban captors

A Pentagon psychologist says returned captives typically take anywhere from five days to three weeks to go throw the process of reintegration in which Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl (boh BURG'-dahl) now finds himself.

A senior U.S. official says Bergdahl has told people treating him at a U.S. military medical facility in Germany that he was tortured, beaten and held in a cage after he tried to escape from his Taliban captors in Afghanistan.

The New York Times reports that doctors say Bergdahl is physically able to travel but not emotionally prepared to be reunited with his family and has not yet spoken to them.

Once Bergdahl is considered ready, he is expected to be flown to an Army medical center in San Antonio, where it is believed he will be reunited with his family.

Bergdahl was returned to the U.S. military a week ago in exchange for the release of five Taliban militants from the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

The deal has ignited a political firestorm and the FBI says authorities are investigating threats made against Bergdahl's family.

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060-c-22-(Violet Ikonomova (EE'-koh-NOH'-moh-vah), AP correspondent)-"to his family"-Details of what Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl's five years in captivity may have looked like are starting to emerge. AP correspondent Violet Ikonomova has more. (8 Jun 2014)

<<CUT *060 (06/08/14)££ 00:22 "to his family"

059-v-30-(Violet Ikonomova (EE'-koh-NOH'-moh-vah), AP correspondent)--Word from a senior U.S. official this morning that Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl says he was tortured, beaten and held in a cage by his Taliban captors. AP correspondent Violet Ikonomova has more. (8 Jun 2014)

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APPHOTO WX201: FILE - In this file image taken from video obtained from Voice Of Jihad Website, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, sits in a vehicle guarded by the Taliban in eastern Afghanistan. Bergdahl was freed by the Taliban on May 31, 2014, in exchange for five Afghan detainees held in the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Two American values, never leave a man behind and never negotiate with terrorists, collided in the Bergdahl calamity with each ethos running deep in the American conscience. (AP Photo/Voice Of Jihad Website via AP video, File) (4 Jun 2014)

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APPHOTO WX203: FILE - This image taken from video obtained from Voice Of Jihad Website, authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, shows men in civilian clothing leading Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl, in white, towards a helicopter in eastern Afghanistan. Bergdahl was freed on May 31, 2014, in exchange for five Afghan detainees held in the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Two American values, never leave a man behind and never negotiate with terrorists, collided in the Bergdahl calamity. Each ethos runs deep in the American conscience, yet has been violated through history and notably in the age of terrorism, where traditional standards of warfare, spying and negotiating are run through a hall of mirrors. (AP Photo/Voice Of Jihad Website via AP video) (4 Jun 2014)

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