China criticizes reported US spying on computers around the world

WASHINGTON (AP) — China's Foreign Ministry is accusing the U.S. of "playing up the cyber threats from other countries" while at the same time implementing its own cyber surveillance program that it says is threatening the sovereignty and security of other countries.

The statement comes in reaction to a New York Times report that the National Security Agency has implanted software on nearly 100,000 computers around the world that allows it to spy on those machines. The computers don't include any in the United States.

The NSA says its efforts focus only on "valid foreign intelligence targets."

According to the report, China's army has been one of the most frequent targets of the NSA and U.S. Cyber Command. The U.S. has accused China's army of launching regular attacks on American industrial and military targets, often to steal secrets or intellectual property.

The paper says parts of the program were disclosed in documents leaked by Edward Snowden, the former NSA systems analyst.

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162-w-37-(Rita Foley, AP correspondent, with Keir Giles (keer jylz), associate fellow, International Security and Russia and Eurasia Program, Chatham House)--Experts are reacting to a report that the NSA put software on thousands of computers around the world. AP correspondent Rita Foley reports on what they're saying. (15 Jan 2014)

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144-a-20-(Keir Giles (keer jylz), associate fellow, International Security and Russia and Eurasia Program, Chatham House, in AP interview)-"of different targets"-Security analyst Keir Giles says the NSA has used two completely different technologies to spy on computers that other countries have tried to shield from hacking. (15 Jan 2014)

<<CUT *144 (01/15/14)££ 00:20 "of different targets"

APPHOTO NY108: FILE - This Thursday, June 6, 2013, file photo, shows a sign outside the National Security Administration (NSA) campus in Fort Meade, Md. The National Security Agency has implanted software in nearly 100,000 computers around the world — but not in the United States — that allows the U.S. to conduct surveillance on those machines, The New York Times reported Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014. ((AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File) (6 Jun 2013)

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