Evers-Williams urges more work on civil rights

WASHINGTON (AP) — Five decades after the historic March on Washington, Myrlie Evers-Williams sees a "retrenchment" in this country when it comes to civil rights.

The widow of slain civil rights leader Medgar Evers told those gathered for the 50th anniversary ceremony in Washington that, "We know today that everything is not okay."

Evers-Williams said there's too much of an emphasis in today's world on individuality — and how people can reach their own personal goals.

She challenged a new generation of parents and leaders to work on community building, saying "it is your problem ... these are our children."

The country will reach that mountaintop that Martin Luther King Jr. talked about, she said, but "it will take each and every one of us."

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