From outsiders to bombing suspects in Boston

By

WASHINGTON (AP) — Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (joh-KHAR' tsahr-NEYE'-ehv) sought to embrace American lives after emigrating from Russia — joining a boxing club, winning a scholarship and even seeking U.S. citizenship. But their uncle last week angrily called them "losers" who failed to feel settled even after a decade of living in the United States.

The brothers' struggle to assimilate in the U.S. and their alleged bombing of the Boston Marathon reflect what counterterror experts describe as a classic pattern of young first- or second-generation immigrants striking out after struggling to fit in.

The U.S. has long been worried about people in America who are not tied to any designated terrorist group but who are motivated by ideologies that lead them to commit violent acts.

©2014 by The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.