U.S. Postal Service Reports Nearly $2 Billion Loss In Q2


UPDATED: Friday May 9, 2014 11:00 AM

The U.S. Postal Service reported a $1.9 billion loss for the first three months of this year and pleaded again Friday for reforms to its troubled financial system.

The agency said the loss for the quarter that ended March 31 matched the $1.9 billion in red ink in the same period last year and marked the 20th time of the last 22 quarters that it posted a loss.

It came despite a 2.3 percent rise in its operating revenue and continued cost-cutting efforts. Postal officials have said repeatedly that they need comprehensive legislation that includes more control over its personnel and benefit costs and more flexibility in pricing and products. Though various legislative proposals have been advanced, Congress has not passed a bill with the requested changes.

"The Postal Service is working diligently to improve its finances by streamlining our network to improve efficiency, reduce operating costs and increase revenue, which was up $379 million over the same period last year - the third straight quarter of revenue increase," Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe said in a statement. "However, we will still incur annual inflationary cost increases ... and first-class mail volume continues to decline."

Details in the report for the second quarter of the budget year, compared to the same period last year, included:

-Operating revenue was $16.7 billion, an increase of $379 million or 2.3 percent.

-Operating expenses before non-cash workers' compensation expenses were cut to $17.9 billion from $18.1 billion, a 1.1 percent improvement.

-Total mail volume fell to 38.1 billion pieces from 38.8 billion pieces.

-Volume in shipping and packages rose 7.3 percent.

-First-class mail declined 4.1 percent.

The Postal Service is an independent agency that receives no tax dollars for its day-to-day operations but is subject to congressional control. It has asked to end most Saturday deliveries, a move it says could save about $2 billion annually. And it's seeking to reduce its congressionally mandated $5.6 billion annual payment for future retiree health benefits.

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