Central Ohio Police Adapting To 'Baiting' Tactics By The Public

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UPDATED: Wednesday March 12, 2014 6:38 PM

Some in law enforcement said there is a growing trend of people testing them.

Officers said more people are attempting to bait people into violating their rights so they catch it on camera, and in some cases, cash in.

10TV obtained dash camera video from the Beavercreek Police Department. The video shows a man wearing a rifle on his back, admitting to the officer why he is carrying a gun.

The man tells the officer he is going to go to every city and try to get a lawsuit to make some easy money. The officer then asks if he is trying to set officers up. The man answers, “Yeah.”

Here in central Ohio, Grove City Police Captain Jeff Pearson said his officers have experienced similar encounters.

“In one aspect, it's frustrating. On the other hand, it's our responsibility to know the law, and to know how to act under certain circumstances.”

Gun rights advocate Dave Noice says he has been openly carrying a firearm since the late 80s. He said he doesn't condone testing police, but he doesn't condemn it either.

“If law enforcement is able to use bait cars to lure criminals into doing a criminal act, then I don't know I'm against an open carrier into luring a police officer into harassment,” Noice said.

On YouTube, there are many videos of people attempting to test police, and the people don’t always use guns.

In one video, a man appears to be smoking what looks like marijuana, but after an officer approaches, they reveal its tobacco.

In another video, people are seen squeezing water out of a bottle so it looks as if they are urinating.

Those acts may not break any laws, but they divert officer's attention away from real crimes. “It's not quite to the level of a false 911 call, but in the same category. We are spending our time doing something we don't need to be doing, just because someone wants to get a reaction out of the police,” Captain Pearson said.

Pearson said officers will continue to protect and serve, despite time-wasting pranks.

It's important to point out , just last week in Columbus, a man was arrested and charged for inducing panic for allegedly breaking into a fake ATM.

Police say even pranks can result in real charges.  

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